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Best Songs To Drive To

For some it's a guilty pleasure – for others, it's just a pleasure. And let's face it we have all done it - singing in the car of course. It's best done at full volume and at the top of your voice. Glance across while stuck in traffic and you are likely to see a fellow driver singing along to the same track as you, blaring out from the radio. These days your stunning vibrato or alto could even be recorded. Technology lovers may enjoy a visual treat to complement the audio one. This can be provided by a dashcam – but just make sure it's pointed in the right direction!

Your passengers may determine the soundtrack in your car. If you are a parent your musical choice may already be decided for you. 'Let it Go' from Frozen, anyone? Teenage passengers on the other hand automatically assume control of the music system, even if you are comfortably sitting in your own car humming along to something pretty inoffensive. You could swiftly find your musical preference intercepted and replaced by tracks from One Direction, Mark Ronson or the Vamps.

Neither a family driving holiday in France nor a quick trip to the supermarket is complete without the right music to accompany the journey. Using the latest and most sophisticated research techniques (a quick fire poll round the office), here are some cool tunes to consider next time you are in the car:

1. Jay-Z – Empire State of Mind. With vocals by Alicia Keys this rap song from Jay-Z's eleventh album will leave you energised and motivated. You may well divert your journey and head to the airport for a flight to NYC after singing along to this. It's impossible to listen without punching the air, so beware strange looks from other drivers!

2. Daft Punk – Get Lucky. Not only will you be singing you may well have to resist the urge to dance too. Remember the rule kids- never dance and drive.

3. Oasis - Champagne Supernova. Travel back to the 90's with this iconic track. The central message of this song has been debated over the years –' slowly walking down the hall/faster than a cannonball'. What?! Regardless this is a powerful song much loved by many.

4. Stone Roses – Fool's Gold. Released as we left the 80's and joined the 90's this track set the tone for the next decade. Wind the window down and share its majesty with other drivers

5. The Beatles – Get Back. No list would be complete without a track from the Beatles. Originally recorded in 1969 its message is very relevant today (just listen to the lyrics).

6. Queen – full of passion and fire it's almost impossible to pick only one Queen track. For those loyal to the bands' roots how about the beautifully operatic bohemian rhapsody. 'Will you do the fandango?' Please, only in the comfort of your own home.

7. U2 – Where the Streets Have no Name. One of U2's most popular songs, this takes the tempo down a notch before blowing you away. Oh you may like to air guitar along too (in your head of course – safety first, remember point 2)

8. Led Zeppelin – Immigrant Song. You may recognise a version of this from the movie Shrek the third which is probably the most juxtapositioned sentence ever! Perfect if you have had a tough day and need to vent a little.

9. Abba – so good they made their soundtrack into a movie, you can take your pick.How about a little Dancing Queen followed by Mamma Mia? You can't go wrong with either of these - a tried and tested mood lifter.

10. Frankie Goes to Hollywood – the Power of Love. A proper full on ballad. Mostly played on radio during the festive period but you can really exercise your lungs to this song. Give it a go - and remember all the dramatic inflections too.

By Tracey McBain